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of commons in his weekly question time session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. >> order. questions to the prime minister. alison seabeck. >> thank you, mr. speaker. this morning i had meetings with mine tieral colleagues and others and in addition to my duties in the house i will have other meetings today. >> alison sea beck. >> i'm hear to speak, it right a mother in his constituency should not speak of the bedroom tax and confirm why her minister be able to offer her son, serving in the magesty's armed forces either a home or a bedroom on his return from duty? >> the reforms to housing benefit that we're putting in place, i'll very happily look at the case, as the honorable lady says. but the reforms that are put in place have a very clear principle of the heart. there are many people in private rented accommodation who do not have housing benefits and can't afford extra bedrooms and we have to get control of housing benefits. we're now spending as a country $23 billion pounds on
down our debt in a way that grows our economy and create good jobs. the decision that will make a real difference in the strength of our recovery. we began with economists and business leaders saying that we are poised to grow. there are signs of progress. car sales are at a five year high. manufacturing is coming back. businesses created 2.2 million jobs last year. we have learned that our economy created more jobs in the last few months that economists are originally thought. this week we also received the first testament of the economic growth over the last a few months. it reminded us that bad decisions in washington can get in the way of economic rugrats. we agree -- economic progress. we agree that we cannot cut our way to prosperity. it has not worked in the past and it will not work today. it could weaken our economy. a could cost us jobs. not just now, but in the future. what we need is a balanced approach. an approach that says let's cut would we can afford, but make the investments we cannot afford to live without. investment in education, research thomas development. -- of
session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. dispersed so they can go to the projects so desperately needed. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the cells i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. is it right that a mother and my contingency may not -- confirmed by his minister, her son serving in her majesty's armed forces -- [inaudible] >> the reforms to housing benefit that we're putting in place, and i'm happy to look at the case of the honorable lady says -- [shouting] >> but they have a very clear principle out of their hard. there are many people who don't have housing benefit, who cannot afford extra bedrooms, and we have to get control of housing benefits. we are now spending as the country 23 billion pounds on housing benefits and we have to get that budget under co
start a businesses create jobs and spur the economy. we will hear from jerry moran who authored the start impact, legislation aimed at helping businesses grow the economy. this discussion as part of a policy summit held by the consumer electronics association in las vegas. it is an hour. >> so, good afternoon. my name is larry downes. it means for an hour i can be up here and not back in the audience taking notes. just before the election, i wrote an article asking what it was that of intrapreneurs needed from washington. our panelists today may have a more productive agenda to discuss. i know there are many in the audience who are from washington. that is great because you will be hearing from some actual business owners and organizers -- organizations interested to talk about when the start up a economy does and does not need from washington. it is my great pleasure to introduce senator jerry moran will provide some introductory mar remarks -- remarks. both in the senate and then before 2010, and during seven terms in the house. he successfully led opposition with senator bide
programs. a lot of these visa programs, especially when the economy's doing really well and there's a lot of jobs available in the country, they fill up pretty quickly. visas for high-skill immigrants , the tech really wants that, wants more of those. you also have the h-2-b visas for foreign workers kind of for nonagricultural seasonal businesses. and you also have the h-2-a visa program which is mostly for agricultural workers. all these visa programs either have an arbitrary cap or are not being used that widely. basically that what businesses is want is they want to adjust these programs to the market so they can kind of rise and fall with demand. >> we thank you for your time today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> if you go to most american hivetry textbooks i would also make you a bet, if you go back to the textbooks you had in high high school, you can take me up on my bet, but my bet with you is that in your american history textbooks in high school, if you go to the index, you will find no mention
, so we can strengthen our economy, and strengthen our country's future. think about it. we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants. that is who we are, in our bones. the promise we see in those that come here from every corner of the globe, that has always been one of our greatest strengths. it keeps our recourse young, a key to our country on the cutting edge, and helped to build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known. after all, immigrants help to start businesses like google, and yahoo!, they created entire new industries that in turn created new jobs and new prosperity. in recent years, one in four high-tech start-ups in america were founded by immigrants. one in four new small business owners were immigrants, including right here in nevada. folks who came here seeking opportunity and now want to share that opportunity with other americans. but we all know that today we have an immigration system that is out of date and badly broken. a system that is holding us back, instead of helping us to grow our economy and strengthen our middle-class. right now, we have
economy, and the influence of our diplomacy and the creative energy of our people remain unrivaled. no, it is because as the world has changed, so to have a level -- the levers of power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think about it like this. truman and acheson were killed in the parthenon with classical geometry and clear lines. tellers or a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by major powers. that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. time takes its toll, even on the greatest edifice. we do need a new architecture for this new world. more frank gehry than formal greek. some of his work at first might appear have howser. in fact, it is highly intentional -- half hazard. in fact, it is highly intentional and sophisticated. today, we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership. as we saw from the intervention to stop the massacre in libya to the rate at brought osama bin laden to justice, there will always be times when
. often they do that in the shadow economy, a place where employers may offer them less than the minimum wage or make them work overtime without extra pay. when that happens, it's not as bad for them, it's bad for the entire economy, because all the businesses that are trying to do the right thing that are hiring people legally, paying a decent wage, following the rules, they are the ones to suffer. they have got to compete against companies that are breaking the rules. the wages and working conditions of american workers are threatened as well. if we are truly committed to strengthening our middle-class and providing more ladders of opportunity to those who are willing to work hard to make it into the middle class, we've got to fix the system. we have to make sure that every business and every worker in america is pulling by the same set of rules. we have to bring in the shadow economy into the light so that everybody is held accountable. the businesses and the immigrants getting on the right side of the law. common-sense. that's why we need comprehensive immigration reform. host: presi
, federal debt/deficit, which of those three issues will be paramount in that senate campaign? economy improves, it will be the economy. if it is beyond the economy, i think health care might be an issue. whatever democrat runs probably voted for it. whatever republican runs and did not vote for it. i do not think that will be a big issue unless there is a lot of administrative action taken by this president that is going to turn gun owners off. then the president could raise it to a big campaign issue. i do not think any action by congress will raise it to a big campaign issue. >> i want to ask the questions about immigration reform. a group of eight senators are trying to draft legislation and take the lead on this issue. were you asked to be in the group? what i was not. i suppose i could have volunteered. as ranking member, art dealer leading ranking member of the judiciary committee, it is more ideologically divided. i think i have to be a person that is an honest broker. i am going to look at it from the standpoint of my participating in the 1986 act and try to make sure some of
legal immigration that will build the american economy and strengthen american families. third, we create an effective employment verification system that will present identity theft and tend hiring of future unauthorized workers and lastly, we establish an improved process for e admitting future workers to serve our work force needs while protecting all workers. other bipartisan senators have stood in the same spot before trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there is more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. opportunity to act. but we will only succeed if the effort is bipartisan. by their presence today, my republican colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix our broken immigration system. we democrats are equally serious. we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much rather we want a bipartisan bill that solves the problem and becomes law. we recognize that in order to pass bip
countries grow their economies not just through traditional assistance but also through greater trade and investment, partnerships with the private sector, better governance and more participation from women. we think this is an investment in our own economic future and i love saying this because people are always quite surprised to hear it, seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in africa. other countries are doing everything they can to help their companies win contracts and invest in emerging markets. other countries still are engaged in a very clear and relentless economic diplomacy. we should, too, and increasingly, we are. and make no mistake, there is a crucial strategic dimension to this development work, as well. weak states represent some of our most significant threats. we have an interest in strengthening them and building more capable partners that can tackle their own security problems at home and in their neighborhoods, and economics will always play a role in that. next, think about energy and climate change. managing the world's energy supplies in
. we still have a risk to the economy. i don't see us heading off to a robust, fast recovery. i think 2013 will be better than 2012. i wish i could tell you that it would be really good because that's what we need. >> i don't call myself an economist. i specialize in economic policy. i try to be a good consumer of other forecasts. one thing i learned from that is frankly i don't trust any macro forecast that goes beyond six months. i don't think -- they are just guessing beyond that. i think we probably -- at least i would have similar reactions. i am still concerned about the risks posed by europe. i'm still quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year or two ago. balance sheets are repairing. yes, things seem to be heading in the right direction. but i also think that people often make the mistake of confusing the level for the growth rate. i think we need to understand that even if the economy grows at 2% or 3% this year which seems to be the optimistic b
from how people personally did but how does it into the economy? guest: we are seeing an economy that is recovering slowly from the crisis and recession of 2008 and 2009. we can put a number of side for a minute because that is about investment income. even over the long time horizon, we are seeing incomes rise. people are earning more money. people are starting to put people back to work. certainly, this is not a happy days are here again and everything is fine. we are not healed but it is making progress in that direction. host: take a look at a lot of factors. it look at wages and income and rental income. you look at investment income as a whole. that paints a picture of where americans are financially. guest: that's right. you can't buy the things you need if you don't have income. for some, that is a paycheck from their job or from retirees, social security benefits. or for people who have invested a lot, it might be invested -- investment income dividends. wherever it comes from, that is the core of how you buy the things you need and want. host: our guests will take a loo
numbers announced yesterday. the economy added 150,000 new jobs, but the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.9%, which is what we have there on our map this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times -- on our map. this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times. patrick, explain how that works, more jobs added, but the unemployment rate goes up. guest: the economy needs to add up -- needs to create enough jobs to make up for people coming into the labour market. this month, we fell slightly short of getting there. it is worth noting, the unemployment rate has a margin for error of 0.2%. when it picks up a 0.1%, we say, it is essentially unchanged. there is a wiggle room for measurements. it is right around par. host: when these numbers come out, the numbers come out, and there is an explanation that they can be adjusted in a month or so down the road trips -- road. guest: tell us about -- as more data comes in, debris-estimate how many jobs came in, and for december, they went from 155,000 jobs to 196,000 jobs. and in november, job growth was showing 146,000 jobs
. everything we do. there is nothing else that impact our economy so directly as energy. whether it is individuals that are struggling to fill up their gas tanks, pay their electric bills, whether it is business leaders making decisions on investments based on the cost of power server farms or smelters, we recognize lower cost is better and that's what everybody is seeking. there are those who would have you believe that the best way to reduce energy's direct cost is simply to raise the direct cost so that we discourage energy use. my friends, this is a self- defeating policy. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely keep. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs by driving up these prices, i would suggest this is a policy that is doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that? our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sour
be a different story. >> i would remind you that three of mind -- six of mine, three of them were the economy. and that really stunned everybody. >> and even getting into this, this is the experience of the league of women voters, they sponsored the debate in 1976 and 1984 and for the sake of transparency i was one of the reporters that ask questions in 1984. when we finished with that, they pulled out of the sponsorship and argued at the time that there was too much party interference and they said that they had no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the american public. i think that this is terribly tough language, but my question this is overstated. >> but my question to you is not as moderators but as reporters. is this something where there may be the beginning of too cozy a relationship between the parties, and the public? >> i really don't -- i did a foreign policy debate and two of my sections were the middle east. are you going to talk about foreign policy without talking about the middle east? >> it is so obvious, why do this? >> if they don't want to do this, t
again. our economy is growing again. the last 24 months of nevada businesses have created almost 30,000 new jobs. last year said been a success story. it is undeniably on track. tonight i can confidently report to the people of nevada that the state of our state grows stronger every day. now stand at the threshold of another legislative session fell shape the future of our great state. we must make some immediate decisions and of the present issues of the day. a challenge is helping nevada that is still on the horizon kicked the system in the future, not too far up a far enough that we must consider what we can be. these of the children's faces to see on the screens behind me. these children are members of the graduating class of 2020. their second graders today. it is my hope that the faces of these children when will inspire us as we consider both the short and long-term realities of our state. two years ago we began laying the foundation for improved education in nevadato win a critical victory for nevada's children. and we did. we passed laws requiring performance-based evaluati
to bring down the debt. not just as a share of economy, but overall. you're right. it doesn't bring down the debt. at all. mr. speaker, that's the conflict that we face here as a people, as a country, not as republicans, not as democrats, but as a people. on the one hand, what our politicians are saying is we're going to use the money to pay down our debt. but what the reality is is that proposers are coming out today that never, ever, ever pay down a penny of debt. now, mr. speaker, if you want to see that for yourself, you can look. the president's budget each year is posted online, on the o.m.b. website. the first one he submitted, i hold the cover page here, was called a new era of responsibility. it was the first budget that the president ever submitted. but as i go through that budget, mr. speaker, what i see is projects -- proximates for 2020, for 20 -- projections for 2020, for 2030, for 2040, for 260 and for 2080 -- 20 of 6 -- 2060 and for 2080. you hear that, you have children. 2020, 2030, 2040, 2060 and 2080. and in each one of those years, according to the president's budget,
and after-- in because of the digital economy include the 15 million people the united states congress heard loud and clear last january and has such enormous cloud on the political process. make no mistake about it. legislators have to do their part. there are democrats and republicans from all across the political spectrum who see the importance of innovation and who are going to stand in the way of those who would try to hot wire the system to favor the incumbent and harm innovation. they seek special help from the government, claiming they won a marketplace that does not involve government intervention. to demonstrate that they really do not get it, they miss the fact that the way you can best promote markets and efficiency and innovation is to have a role for government that addresses market failures, blocks cartels, blocks monopolies, and holds that the anti-competitive forces-really interfere with the most effective operations of free enterprise and innovations that are produced. a legitimate function of government is to defend the market against the forces that into beshear with effi
the economy. think about language. nobody planned the english language. it arose spontaneously it evolved just like the french language, the russian language. there are a few languages that have two things in common, they were designed by human beings, they were planned and no one speaks them. all the languages that people speak are examples of spontaneous order. law, i know we're here in the ray burn -- rayburn office building and everybody thinks they are involved in making law. the fact is, law evolves spon spontaneously. sometimes they turned to a neighbor to settle them. some of the wisest neighbors became known as judges. that's how precedent and case law built up. it was actually much into that process that government started saying let's write it down. and intrude it and change it through legislative or skeeverd. money, most people think money is something ben bernanke prints. but it evolved because again, people had problem. how do i trade? if i have a fish and you have an apple then we have an easy trade. but if i don't like apples and you have enough fish then we have to make the tr
the american economy and strengthen american families. third, creating an effective employment verification system that will prevent identity theft and and the hiring of future unauthorized workers. leslie, an approved process for admitting future workers to serve the nation's workforce needs while simultaneously protecting all workers. other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe that this will be the year that congress finally gets this done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there has been more political risk in opposing immigration reform than supporting it. host: senator chuck schumer, outlining the details of the immigration reform agreement so far. here is the headline from "roll call," this morning. host: here to talk more about this story, the staff writer at "roll-call," humberto sanchez. have democrats been able to move the ball forward? caller: it appears so, but principle is a big step forward. senator schumer mentioned that. it has been tried for a couple of
to the time they leave higher education, we must prepare them to succeed in a 21st century economy. and if we are sincere in our concern for the next generation, how we deal with one another matters, not only during this session but also throughout the campaigns that bring us to these positions of public trust. every day, our kids watch what we do and learn from our example. members of the 63rd legislature, what i ask of you tonight is simple and straightforward: first, be responsible with our budget, because i won't allow you to spend more than we take in or make cuts that undermine our long-term stability. second, join me in focusing on creating jobs, investing in education, and making government more effective, and lastly, act in a manner that we're not ashamed to have our children watching, because they are. i am taking these principles to heart, and we've hit the ground running to create better jobs, better schools and a more effective government. a company recently came to the state of montana and said they'd like to locate a manufacturing facility in great falls, but they needed a work
of months. to be sure the economy created jobs but it's at a relatively modest pace. we had a report recently of a contraction in the nation's output in the fourth quarter of last year. increasingly you have people like laura tyson writing columns calling for the need for a plan for faster growth, not deficit reduction. what is the president -- i know you've talked about how all the president's plans envision job creation, but what does the president tell his advisors when he sees these signs of a sluggish recovery? what is he asking in the way of things to speed recovery, create jobs and stimulate growth? >> i'll go to the narrow question first. every time the president meets with his economic advisors to discuss policy proposals and refinements to existing policies, the focus is on job creation and economic growth. and that includes when we have discussions about deficit reduction. as i've said many times and as the president has made clear, deficit reduction is not a goal unto itself. it is a means to, if done right , the desired goal, which is greater growth and greater job creat
debate. >> there is no question that the economy is what the elections are about. but i would point out to the scholars that there were two chefs in public opinion during this campaign. the first one came after the first debate. when suddenly, here came romney and people said, that look like obama was going to run away with it, and the second change came at the end of the democratic convention, after the speech by bill clinton. these chefs do change minds and i think fat they are one of the best parts of the campaign process and i think that we need to have more debates. >> but let me say to the scholars, they overlook the obvious and maybe that is why they are scholars. [laughter] no, that is applied -- that is not a put down. scholars need to go beyond the obvious. that is what makes them scholars. what is obvious is that 64 million people watched the first debate. four years ago was about the same number and there was no two-one change like there was in 2012 of what the debates too, they are confirming exercises. and the scholars tend to say, they did not change any votes and as a co
enforcement in the 1970's, the men and women in the academy and then when they are out of the economy, the men and women are retrained on a monthly basis. they go to training. they go to the gun range. they are marksman. we have men and women that never pulled a service revolver. there has to be -- we do have gun-control in california. i do believe it does help, it really does help. i commend our senators and our president. newtown is a tragedy, a travesty. i have a granddaughter and there are young children who are our relatives. it does not make a difference. it could be young or old. we had a gentleman -- or rather a murderer from orange county, riverside county rather, the law enforcement gathered together. they were very emboldened and the economy in san diego. it tooks swap teams probably seven hours to get this man out. he had broken into a house and stole 30 guns, besides being a wanted murder. they did get him. i am proud of our men and women here in california. host: one more question. if the congress could do one thing, what would you like to see them do? caller: i would like to see
, is unconscionable. when we turn this economy around, and it will rebound, we need to end hunger now. we may not be able to wipe out all disease, we probably can't eliminate war, but we have the resources, we know what it takes. we need to muster the will to end hunger once and for all. hunger is a political condition. it's important to point out that even though 50 million people were food insecure, the vast majority had a safety net that prevented them from actually starving. that safety ned is called the supplement -- that safety net is called snap. snap is a program that provides low-income families with food they otherwise could not afford to buy. more than 75 million families relied on snap to provide food for their families. it is a lifeline for these 47 million people who struggle to make ends meet. i don't deny this is a big number, but it's a big number because it's a big problem. mr. speaker, america's hunger problem will be dramatically worse without snap. just imagine what this country would look like if we didn't have the safety net that snap provides for low-income families in
of the economy and financial crisis, that is what we are asking about you this morning, if the financial crisis has delayed those plants for you. give us a call. robert, clinton, md., you are on, sir. caller: 401k, in the early part of november my three kids were named the beneficiaries. we did all the paperwork. here it is, since february 4, and i have not got the money yet. the company that has the 401k, first of all, you cannot find them. i work in the credit union. they would not give you any information about the company that had the 401k. here it is, the fourth, and they still have not got the money. you have got to wait a long time to get your money. host: tell us a little bit about your plans, because of the limbo you are in. what does that mean for you? caller how it means i have to be very careful about four hope -- 401k. if something happened to me, i would release the money to my kids or something like that. if they needed it right away, they could get it, but they still have not received the money. i still do not know how these things work. because of the interest, i do not know. t
to the economy that we are not going to like. the headline from last week about the slowing of our gdp, it is going to be a situation where it is no longer acceptable to kick the can. so, when we talk about the need for tax reforms, i am one who says that we have got to put it all on the table. we have got to be willing to make some very difficult choices. the options if we fail to act are not something that most in this country will be satisfied with. >> i know that says you want to take a look at some of the energy initiatives here. in the house they talked about doing energy efficiency legislation puc that moving? still questionable? >> let me just start by saying that i am a firm believer in doing more in this country when it comes to efficiency. it is one of the legs of the energy tool that is absolutely critical to us. i think it is often overlooked. people look -- people look to the old technologies and there are things making news. someone joked to me once that if we could just figure out how to have a groundbreaking or ribbon cutting that involved some kind of energy efficienc
, the budget was lower than when he came in. that is the story now. how did he do that? did the economy grow a lot? unemployment was below 5%. the budget was balanced because of his own parsimony. how did he manage to make the budget go lower? how did that help the economy? it was a lot, he got the government out of the way of the economy. >> the life of the 30th president of the united states, "coolidge," on sunday, 8:00, on q&a. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are back with congressman mcdermott, the ranking democrat on the house subcommittee. let me read to you from "the national journal bailey," and what they had to say about sequestration -- national journal daily," and what they had to say about sequestration. host: true, accurate reporting? caller: -- guest: as far as what i can tell, that is exactly what is happening. unfortunately for the american people, the leadership on the republican side is still acting as though the election never occurred. they have got to except that the people have said that they once what obama is doing. they reelected him overwhelmingly. and t
. this is what i tell secretary geithner. the time has come, since our economies are connected, for there to be a positive movement in the european crisis, but then i think these budget negotiations, which are not based on simply -- based on human beings and republicans and democrats getting together. i think it is very doable and possible. one thing we have ignored at this meeting, there was an election that just happened, and the message of the election, i believe, is guys, women, you've got to get together, or there is going to be a third party. >> that is one of the reasons we have been having these conversations. >> but it is out now. it is on the cable channels, on the radio, online, in print. what happens now? >> i say i want to get on television with some facts. [laughter] here are few that have come out of this conversation. 16.9% of gdp, that is not because tax rates went down. it is because the economy went down. tax rates -- there is no revenue. [indiscernible] in the years before the collapse, the income as well over 18% of gdp. >> it has been over 18% twice. two y
the economy. make it easy for people to stay and grow american jobs to help our economy recover. >> what is the atmosphere for potential immigration reform in congress? >> we have had an interest in immigration reform for white some time. we have not -- for quite some time. in november,al -- mr. romney lost badly. part of the reason why is because he got under 30% of votes among latino voters. there is a divide that is partly because of the republican' immigration. the republican -- and this is a very fast growing demographic. they have to join us. they have to deal with immigration reform. we're happy to compete for voters aren't other subjects. -- on other subjects. >> this is a priority for the tech community? >> it is. it is something i have been working on for a long time. it is a decision that the republican leadership needs to make. i cannot make it for them. i am hopeful that they will decide that it is a good thing to put behind them. i know that we can work together to make it so. >> what else do your from your constituents in the silicon valley area about washington? -- what e
economy, this congress said no, our motto would be in god we trust. and when i was a young boy, john kennedy facing the cuban missile crisis said this, the guiding principle of this country has always been, is today and will forever be in god we trust. mr. speaker, with that great history of faith, why is it that faith is under attack so much across this nation? well, mr. speaker, tune in, because in a few weeks, we will be back on this floor and we'll tell you who's doing it and why they are doing it and what we need to do to stop it. i thank you and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from new york, mr. jeverries is recognized for 60 -- mr. jeffries is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. jeffries: i ask for unanimous consent that the -- be entered into the record a letter from the distinguished gentlelady from texas, mrs. johnson. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. jeffries: today we are here as members o
a living. often they do that in the shadow economy, a place where employers may offer them less than the minimum wage or make them work overtime without extra pay. when that happens, it's not as bad for them, it's bad for the entire economy, because all the businesses that are trying to do the right thing that are hiring people legally, paying a decent wage, following the rules, they are the ones to suffer. they have got to compete against companies that are breaking the rules. the wages and working conditions of american workers are threatened as well. if we are truly committed to strengthening our middle-class and providing more ladders of opportunity to those who are willing to work hard to make it into the middle class, we've got to fix the system. we have to make sure that every business and every worker in america is pulling by the same set of rules. we have to bring in the shadow economy into the light so that everybody is held accountable. the businesses and the immigrants getting on the right side of the law. common sense. that's why we need comprehensive immigration reform.
we have less of it. the might of our military, the size of our economy, the influence of our diplomacy, and the creative energy of our people remains unrifle. no, it is because as the world has changed, so, too, have the levers of power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think of it like this -- truman and acheson were building the parthenon with classical geometry unclear lines. the colors were a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by major powers, and that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. but time takes a toll even on the greatest benefits -- edifice, and we do need a new architecture for a new world. more frank gehry than formal greek. [laughter] think of it. some of his work might appear at first haphazard, but it is highly intentional and sophisticated. where once a few strong columns could hold up the weight of the world, today we need a dynamic mixture of materials and structures. american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership, as we saw from the inter
with the leader of the opposition talked about the economy, he sounds just like an extraordinary undertaker looking forward to a hard one to? does he not accept that you cannot get out of a debt crisis by borrowing more money? >> my honorable friend makes a very good point. the fact is the economy that we inherited was completely unbalanced. it was based on housing but it was based on finance. it was based on government spending and those based on immigration. those were for incredibly unstable pillars for sustained economic growth. what we that it is a major recovery operation. that operation is still underway but you can see in the new jobs created in the private sector businesses that are expanding them into new people signing up the businesses we are making progress. >> george galloway. [shouting] >> following yesterday's announcement, will the prime minister -- [inaudible] the key differences between the and chopping, crosscutting jihadists, fighting a dictatorship and valley that we are announced to kill, and the equally bloodthirsty jihadists that we're giving money, material, politi
joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i began looking at what other cities around america were doing. i came over to mayor bloomberg, who i called the obi-wan kenobi of mayors. all of us young padawans come to see what is going on over here. i could not wait to talk about climate change. the time is now. we just focus on cities where the carbon output is significant. if we do pragmatic things, we are going to make change. he started showing me programs he
wars, an economy in freefall, traditional alliances fraying, our diplomatic standing damaged and around the world people questioning america's commitment to core values and our ability to maintain our global leadership. that was my in box on day one as your secretary of state. today, the world remains a dangerous and complicated place and of course we still face many difficult challenges but a lot has changed in the last four years. under president obama's leadership, we've ended the war in iraq, begun a transition in afghanistan and brought osama bin laden to justice. we've also revitalized american diplomacy and strengthened our alliances and while our economic recovery is not yet complete, we are heading in the right direction. in short, america today is stronger at home and more respected in the world. and our global leadership is on firmer footing than many predicted. to understand what we have been trying to do the last four years, it's helpful to start with some history. last year, i was honored to deliver the lecture at the forrestal naval acadamy named for our first secretary o
living in a county that is almost 10,500 miles of land mass. wyoming's economy is based on energy production, coal, natural gas, oil, uranium, and wind. the people working in the energy industry make a sufficient salary, but in some cases, it can skew the average income for families based on statewide data. some families do well financially. there are still a number of people struggling to make ends meet. this can be another challenge to meeting designating guidelines. thank you for your time and attention to this important matter. >> thank you for being with us. thank you for your testimony. i went forth witnesse is dr. andrew wilper. he is a practicing general internist. he is the associate program director at the boise internal director program. thank you for being with us. >> thank you. it is a great honor to testify here today. i was asked by senator sanders about my insight. one about the lack of health insurance in the united states and it affects on health and healthcare outcomes and to share my thinking on solutions to to the primary care workforce shortage. there is an e
living in a county that is almost 10,500 miles of land mass. wyoming's economy is based primarily on energy production -- coal, natural gas, uranium, and even wind, making it a boom and bust economy. many working in the agent -- in the area make significant salaries when they work, but this can skew the average income for families. although some do well financially, there are a number of people struggling to make ends meet. this income disparity can be a challenge to meeting designation guidelines. thank you for your time and attention to this very important matter. i look forward to any questions you may have. our fourth witness is the acting chief at the boise medical wrote center. dr. wilbert is the associate program director for the internal medicine program and the va center of excellence in primary care education. thanks very much for being with us. >> thank you, chairman sanders and members of the committee. it is a great honor to be able to testify here today. i was asked by senator sanders about my insight. specifically, and insight about the lack of health insurance in t
it in our economy. this is a first and foremost an economic imperative. many republicans know and see that. we would provide the marketplace with education materials so that people understand this is the right thing to do. we have agreed we're not going to put people on buses and 747's. we're also not going to say, this is a passport for everybody. we know the solution is in the middle. that is what we have to work on. rejecting a notion because of a lack of conviction for immigration is going to make matters worse. we have a disadvantage versus canada and australia. they have updated their system. hours dates back to the 1950's, 1960's, 1970's, and 1980's. host: to take a super pac aimed at electing republicans dedicated to reforming immigration. let's go to the phones. caller: good morning. i would like to set the record straight. there are not 11 million illegal aliens in this country. there were more like 26 million. obama wants to extend the invitation to come there to these people's families. we could end up with 35 million people. 70% of the people are from mexico and south america.
created in our economy go unfulfilled. why? too many people lack the skills to fill them. your vote on a bill will allow us to partner with businesses to put more workers with the skills they need to go into jobs that are in the highest demand. often times, this barrier is the state's own licensing system. in maryland, we can remove those barriers. we have made solid progress in career and technical education at our high schools, but there is so much more we can do and we must do. lifelong learning is the new reality. it must get our heads go graduates the skills they need for lifelong that you must get our high school graduates the skills they need for lifelong learning. we need an innovative solution. elect motivated high school students work toward the high school diploma and to your associates degree at the same time. we can make this sort of early access to affordable college credit. there is ongoing challenge of college completion. you have met with them. i have met with them. business leaders say we are not producing enough college graduates, especially in science, technology
and energy efficiency investments. it's a chance for forward progress on in building our economy and moving ahead from the 21st century. so we anticipate that we'll continue to see calls for expanded investments in energy. and energy efficiency is where we've seen bipartisan support and we're hopeful for progress. there are areas outside of that there might be progress. one sear reforming our nation's chemical laws that govern chemicals used in our workplaces. with that i'll close and look forward to my other panelist's remarks. >> i know that we have some new faces in the crowd who weren't here before. if you have a device my advice is to silence it. >> so the first time i realized that something was changing in america was in september 2009 at the taxpayer march in washington. i came down to check that out and i found hundreds of thousands of people there and many were holding this nerdy libertarian science. how did an obscure economist it on a protest sign outside of the capital? that is something i had never seen before in politics. there have been two elections since then -- 2010 and 2
for -- reintroduce him. and that is dr. reinhardt. he is the james madison professor of political economy at princeton university, and contributing writer to "the new york times" economix blog. thank you for being with us. >> i am very honored by it. i should have added that i was delivered by a midwife, and of course my mother. i once told that to a member of the american medical association. he said, it shows. i am not sure what he meant. i divided my written statement into three parts. is our medical capability efficiently used? the answer is no. the second is, what public policy levers does congress have, given that we want more primary-care physicians, to move them into that field, and also to practice where they are needed? the third is, to what extent can financial incentives be used, which you have already answered him and talked about. the traditional model of workforce forecasting has been to focus on physician population ratios, as if all the other people who work in the primary care team did not matter. my whole career has been to say we should use non-physician workers far mo
to repave it. host: -- repivot. host: u.s. sanctions are proving counterproductive. the economy is in ruins. the countrydeadlocked in the cos heading toward sectarian breakup. the grim prognosis for syria is provided by the latest report provided by the state department working with the free syrian army. guest: i admire him and i know he has been writing quite a bit about him lately. he is symptomatic of the disease that has set into washington, which is a new-found interest in syria. when the revolution began, to find voices of concern over syria was a virtually impossible treasure hunt. we were expressing deep concern than that unless we involve ourselves, when i say involved, i will be careful -- once we did what we could politically to get the disparate opposition groups more organized, the situation would devolve out of control. we are in a situation or our options are in the -- are limited. all of the hand-wringing and chest pounding that the administration and people in the academic community engaged in at this point in time we live the fact that we are at a point lie factere are --
columnist paul krugman will talk about the economy and later,
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